Monday, December 9, 2013

Giving time and company

Metro-North Train Time  Whenever we had a guest who stayed more than a weekend my husband and I would feel really bad not being able to take time off. So I came up with an idea of advising them to take the train to the Grand Central Station and visit New York city. By the time they would be back I would have time to come home from work and make a nice dinner for everyone. Everyone who took the train really enjoyed the view of the mountains and the river. Now that both my husband and I are too old to drive through New York City I have been thinking of taking the train for a day's outing. Last Sunday when the train derailed causing a tragedy, my family was really shocked. We have been taking the train ride for granted. I mean our children take the train for different reasons from doing internship in the city to taking planes. When the media goes on and on about any tragedy you don't even feel like watching the television. Sooner or later we learn to live with the fact and then stop paying attention. It is only when we come across someone who knows someone who was directly affected, we realize the gravity of the tragedy. One victim usually accompanied her sister to different meetings. They say that angels come down to us humans during tragedies. One such angel is a friend of the accident victim who is helping the victim's sister by being with her in meetings. 

20 comments:

Beth said...

I understand what you are saying. Unless a tragedy directly involves us personally we have almost become immune to it.

Launna said...

I completely get what you are saying... it was like that massive super storm that hit th Phillipines... at first I thought how sad... then I remembered someone I know and work with was there.. it came all too real. Luckily he was okay....

fishducky said...

I agree!! I called ALL my friends immediately after 9/11.

Lady Lilith BloodCrave said...

What a great idea. Giving them something to do. I like it. They are not board and you can go to work.

Jim and Sandie said...

When we lived in the Washington, DC area we had lots of company and could not possibly take off from work. So we did the same thing - we told them how to get to the Metro subway and how to ride the buses and sent them on their way. Worked really great. Life continues even with all the tragedies happening around us and I think we as humans must continue to live it to the fullest extent possible. Even those directly impacted by the tragedy must continue to live even while they are grieving.

Mariette VandenMunckhof-Vedder said...

Dearest Munir,
You have been lucky for getting visitors that could help themselves like riding the train. All the many times that we got visitors it usually meant that I had them for the full 3 or 4 or even 6 weeks. When my husband still worked with Campbell Soup's mushroom division, he of course could not take that much time off, so I did the touring with them. But indeed, when any accident involves loved ones or acquaintances we personally know, only than it hits home kind of hard. There are too many people on this planet and for being constantly in a grieving mode would drag us all down emotionally. It is NOT that we don't care but it is a way of survival.
Hugs to you,
Mariette

Granny Annie said...

After the Oklahoma City bombing we had so many friends and relatives that were affected. My cousin, a judge, was fortunately out of the building at time. My friend's dad, and FBI agent had walked across the street for a cup of coffee at the time of the explosion. My husband's brother had driven non-stop from Illinois to carry supplies to assist in the investigation. Our entire family knew someone who knew someone and it was all right in our lap. Yes, it made it very real.

Optimistic Existentialist said...

One of the reasons I would love to live in the northeast is so that I could ride the trains - I've always wanted to :)

Inger said...

You are so right about things hitting home when we know or know of someone involved. That was a terrible accident, one likes to thing of trains as being safe, but they do seem to derail often. Take care, Munir.

TexWisGirl said...

it is true. we take our own safety and life's comforts and conveniences for granted. and we become numb to news reports of accidents and natural tragedies - until they strike so close to home.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Munir .. I wondered if anyone I knew used that railway - it looks a wonderful ride ... but so sad about the accident.

How lovely to know that someone is helping a grieving sister by accompanying them to meetings ..

Sounds so sensible to use public transport if you can .. all the best Hilary

Hope said...

Hi Munir! thank you for your visit over at my blog! :)
A very good suggestion for your guests to take the tour. Unfortunately, tragedy's happen and we may never know how deeply one is affected until it hits you close to home. Thank you for posting!

DWei said...

What an unfortunate situation. I hope for the best.

Birdie said...

I know I am becoming immune to all the tragedy and it makes me sad that I am becoming that way. It is all too much to take in.

Gossip_Grl said...

I didn't know anyone from that tragedy but I agree with the majority of comments that I think we are immune to news stories like this. I know I wish that they showed more stories about communities coming together after a tragedy than continuing day after day to rehash it.

Joanne Noragon said...

A hard way to get there, but perhaps good in the form of train safety will come of this. Our attention span is so short; perhaps the NTSB's is not.

yaya said...

Tragedy happens to people everyday...maybe it's so big it gets media attention..or it could be something that hits your family or friends and not news worthy. We need to be grateful for each day. My Mom and I took the train to NYC while my hubby did a seminar course..we loved it! Having visitors do the same is a great idea!

klahanie said...

Hi Munir,

Sincere apologies for my late arrival to comment on your poignant posting.

It does seem, unless we have a direct connection, we can become desensitised from traumatic events. Although some have been so horrific, they impacted us all.

In kindness,

Gary

Elna said...

Merry Christmas my dear blogfriend.

Hugs

White Lace and Promises said...

There was a train accident in our community. The cargo train jumped track and killed one of our train engineers. It was a freak accident. The young man coached many of the kids in the community for rec football. Our community was greatly affected by the loss.
BTW, thanks for your sweet comment on my blog.
Have a Merry Christmas,
Bonnie